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Project MCP: Highlights for April Challenge #1 and Capturing a Photo with a Shallow Depth of Field

project mcp long banner40 Project MCP: Highlights for April Challenge #1 and Capturing a Photo with a Shallow Depth of Field

 If the old adage “April showers bring May flowers” holds true, there will be colorful blooms all over the place in my part of the country very soon! Given the large amount of rain that has blown across the United States, capturing “wet” should have been a cinch (I hope you have been as lucky in neighboring countries). This week’s challenge was to take a picture illustrating “wet” or “showers”.  Here are a few of the Project MCP Team’s favorites:

brendec7 Project MCP: Highlights for April Challenge #1 and Capturing a Photo with a Shallow Depth of Field

Submitted by brendec7

Julie Shi Photography Project MCP: Highlights for April Challenge #1 and Capturing a Photo with a Shallow Depth of Field

Submitted by Julie Shi Photography

Holly RPhotography Project MCP: Highlights for April Challenge #1 and Capturing a Photo with a Shallow Depth of Field

Submitted by Holly R Photography

LadyLyn Project MCP: Highlights for April Challenge #1 and Capturing a Photo with a Shallow Depth of Field

Submitted by LadyLyn

Week #2′s challenge is to take a photo with a shallow depth of field. Creating a shallow depth of field encourages the viewer’s eye to focus on the main object in the photo, minimalizing distracting backgrounds. A photo taken with a shallow depth of field will have one main focus with a soft background.
The most common, and easiest, way to achieve a photo with a shallow depth of field is to shoot with a larger aperture (Remember, the smaller the f-stop, the larger the aperture). Decreasing the f-stop will increase the aperture and result in a photo with a shallow depth of field, but beware, it may also lower the shutter speed and available light, therefore you may need to consider adding a light source.
Another way to achieve a photo with a shallow depth of field is to move your subject as far away from the background as possible. Creating distance between your subject and the background will produce a sharp focus in the foreground and a soft, blurry look in the background.
If all else fails, set your camera to Portrait Mode, which will produce beautiful portraits with a shallow depth of field.
We cannot wait to see your shallow depth of field photos. If you are just joining us for the first time today, you can learn more about Project MCP on the main page.

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We want to thank our corporate sponsors for Project MCP:

Tamron Project 12 Project MCP: Highlights for April Challenge #1 and Capturing a Photo with a Shallow Depth of Field

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2 Comments

  1. 1
    Alice C. says:

    Gorgeous photos! I particularly love the macro.

  2. 2
    Mandie says:

    You said, “Decreasing the f-stop will increase the aperture and result in a photo with a shallow depth of field, but beware, it may also lower the shutter speed and available light, therefore you may need to consider adding a light source.”

    Actually, decreasing the f-stop and increasing the aperture will give you a *faster* shutter speed and *more* light. Low f-stop is a great way to capture photos in low-light, as long as you don’t need a deep field of view.

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