Lightroom Tutorial – Organizing Photos For Quick Editing

For more great Lightroom Tutorials (and lessons on the Beta version of Lightroom 3) join NAPP (The National Association of Photoshop Professionals).

After you have flagged all your images as “picks” or “rejects” you can get down to making a collection of these images to edit. You will need to decide if you want to delete the non-selected images or keep a file of these Raws just in case. In a recent Lightroom seminar I attended, Scott Kelby recommended deleting them.  His rational was, if they did not make the cut, why keep them?

I however am a picture hog and prefer save things, so I leave them in this original imported catalog.  I then make a collection based on the “picks.”

Start by going to LIBRARY – ENABLE FILTERS – and make sure it is checked off. If not select it so that it is.

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Then go to LIBRARY – FILTER BY FLAG -FLAGGED ONLY

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Now only your Flagged “Picked” images are showing. Then SELECT all images remaining by holding down SHIFT and either selecting via the library or bottom panel. You can also hit Command + “a” or Control + “a” to select all.  They will all by highlighted once you do this.

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Then you will go under LIBRARY – NEW COLLECTION.

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And this dialog box will come up.  Choose the name you want for this collection. I named mine Halloween Photos. You can put it within a set if desired – or leave it as it’s own collection – and then check “Include Selected Photos.”  It is also up to you if you want a virtual copy you can check the last box.  I use that only on select photos.  Then click “create.”

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You can get to this collection on the left side under “collections.”

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And that is all there is to it! From here, since I still do most of my editing in Photoshop, I adjust the white balance, and check and adjust exposure if needed in the develop module.  Then I save (as .jpg or .psd) and open using Autoloader into Photoshop.  Hope this helps for those of you wanting to learn Lightroom!

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11 Comments

  1. […] 1 votes vote Lightroom Tutorial – Organizing Photos For Quick Editing For more great Lightroom Tutorials (and lessons on the Beta version of Lightroom 3) join NAPP […]

  2. […] Continued here: Lightroom Tutorial – Organizing Photos For Quick Editing | MCP … […]

  3. November 3, 2009 at 11:37 am — Reply

    This is exactly how I use Lightroom. I know there is so many more features to it, but I mostly just use it as a catalog and to adjust white balance and exposure before running everything through Photoshop.

  4. November 3, 2009 at 2:38 pm — Reply

    I don’t have Lightroom yet, but am considering upgrading my Photoshop CS2 and purchasing the
    combination of the two with CS4. Presently, I am working with the minimum equipment until my website and business grows…humble beginnings…so, I use my iPhoto program on a hard-drive connected to my
    laptop to sort and store original files and it is working for now, but not very time efficient. Does anyone have advice for me as to where to go from here? Convince me why I should use Lightroom in my workflow. I am taking Jodi’s speed editing workshop this month, so I can take another step forward now that I have a basic understanding of Photoshop and using actions, etc…
    Also, I am wondering what monitor to purchase. I am shopping for a new computer and/or monitor.
    What is the best one for photographers. Please help me, fellow bloggers and MCP fans…I would appreciate any advice you would share. Thanks so much….in labor and about to give birth to my website…xo

  5. November 3, 2009 at 2:40 pm — Reply

    I love my monitor – I have an NEC2690 – it is amazing!

  6. November 3, 2009 at 2:40 pm — Reply

    And while I do not utilize LR to its fullest since I am a PS junkie, I still find it a very valuable tool in my workflow.

  7. November 3, 2009 at 3:07 pm — Reply

    Thanks, Jodi…I am going to look at that monitor for sure and consider Lightroom for exactly that, workflow efficiency… yes, you are a PS junkie…lucky for us! 🙂

  8. Whitney
    November 4, 2009 at 6:05 am — Reply

    Hi Jodi, when you say you then ‘save’ in Lightroom, do you mean you export? That is still confusing for me in switching between Lightroom and Photoshop. Thanks so much!

  9. Luis Barceló
    November 4, 2009 at 9:44 am — Reply

    Well I use lightroom as much as i can, is my principal editing tool, beleave me lightroom is very powerfull you can do very nice retouch with the brushes and save a lot of time, and take to photoshop only a selected number of photos just the ones that realy need it, or the ones for the magazine cover.

    Jody:
    You make beautifull actions for photoshop, i can´t wait to see your presets for lightroom!!

  10. Mara
    November 5, 2009 at 2:25 pm — Reply

    Thanks Jodi- so helpful! I have both Lightroom and Photoshop and one thing I have been trying to work out is the best approach to taking photos into Photoshop from Lightroom and managing the extra file that it creates when you are done editing in Photoshop (the PSD or TIFF). Do you keep in the collection both files? Or do you tag them differently? Or create a new collection? Any tips or future blog posts on this topic would be awesome 🙂 Thanks again for all your tips!

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Lightroom Tutorial – Organizing Photos For Quick Editing